Legal News

From 1 October 2014, the following changes to employment law were implemented: Time Off to Accompany a Pregnant Woman to Ante-Natal Appointments An expectant father or the partner (including a same-sex partner) of a pregnant woman is now entitled to take...
In a case which revealed that alternative dispute resolution is not always a panacea , the Court of Appeal has lamented the 'melancholy fact' that the parties to an apparently commonplace commercial dispute were still engaged in costly litigation more than...
When an organisation fails to follow its own rules, the result can be the nullification of decisions taken and, in appropriate circumstances, those who have transgressed the rules can be liable for their mistakes. Recently, the Court of Appeal was called...
In the unusual case of Embassy of Brazil v De Castro Cerqueira , which raised novel issues relating to the service of employment proceedings on foreign sovereign states, a worker who was dismissed from the Brazilian Embassy in London on reaching the age...
When the Australian Tax Office (ATO) made a request to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) for information about a number of UK companies, HMRC was happy to comply with the request, despite the fact that the companies claimed to have received no notice that...
The creation of a power of attorney is a good way of making sure that your affairs are dealt with by a responsible person if you are unable to manage them yourself. However, when the choice of attorney is a poor one, many difficulties can arise, as a recent...
The owner of a listed home has avoided a hefty VAT bill in respect of the construction of a garage to house his classic car collection after the First-tier Tribunal (FTT) accepted that HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) had erred and that the project should...
In an important victory for developers, which also represents a serious blow to those committed to preserving open spaces for public recreation, a campaigner has failed to convince the Supreme Court that a playing field which had been used by local people...
In general, a landowner does not owe a duty of care to people who voluntarily take risks while on the landowner's property. However, a recent case in the Court of Appeal has illustrated that this may not be the case if the landowner puts themselves in a...
On 1 October 2014, top foodie movers and shakers will gather at Puxton Park, North Somerset to deliver a professional Masterclass on turning small businesses into winning brands. Hosted by leading Bristol law firm Gregg Latchams and small business coaching...
Our Creative, Digital Media & Technology team was delighted to sponsor the social media category at the second annual Bristol Media BR&YOU Awards which took place on Tuesday 16 September at Bordeaux Quay. The BR&YOU Awards celebrate the work...
The Court of Appeal has concluded that a product description which contains a geographical term can constitute 'passing off' if the product does not in fact come from the place named. The description of a product as 'Greek' (in this case Greek yoghurt)...
When cohabitants with children break up, the legal responsibilities of the parents as regards the children are governed by the Children Act 1989 . If amicable arrangements as regards the children cannot be made, the Family Court will rule on matters such...
The purpose of EU Directive 92/85EC – the Pregnant Workers Directive – is 'to encourage improvements in the safety and health at work of pregnant workers and workers who have recently given birth or are breastfeeding'. In the UK, surrogacy is...
There is all the difference in the world between deceit and hard bargaining, as a recent case shows. It involved a disgruntled company which failed to convince the High Court that it had missed out on a multi-million-pound oil and gas exploration deal due...
When a 97-year-old woman died, the bulk of her estate passed to her sister, who herself died only months later, and the remainder – 'the residue' – was left to four charities. Because of the impact of Inheritance Tax (IHT), there would have been...
Two leading investment banks have achieved tax savings of almost £100 million after the Court of Appeal accepted that schemes designed to avoid payment of Income Tax (IT) and National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on employee bonuses lawfully...
A recent decision of the Supreme Court will come as a relief to anyone concerned that they may be left with an adverse credit rating if they terminate a credit agreement because of a breach of contract by the supplier of goods. The case appeared...
When a tenant failed to include precisely the right wording for exercising its right to break its lease, the court ruled that use of the exact words specified was not necessary and therefore disallowed the landlord's claim that the break notice was invalid. ...
Expectations for manufacturing output growth in the next three months are strong, despite an easing of pace over the past quarter, according to the latest CBI Industrial Trends Survey. And export order books have recovered after a dip last month, though...

Latest News

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From 1 October 2014, the following changes to employment law were implemented: Time Off to Accompany a Pregnant Woman to Ante-Natal Appointments An expectant father or the partner (including a same-sex partner) of a pregnant woman is now entitled to take...
-
In a case which revealed that alternative dispute resolution is not always a panacea , the Court of Appeal has lamented the 'melancholy fact' that the parties to an apparently commonplace commercial dispute were still engaged in costly litigation more than...
-
In the unusual case of Embassy of Brazil v De Castro Cerqueira , which raised novel issues relating to the service of employment proceedings on foreign sovereign states, a worker who was dismissed from the Brazilian Embassy in London on reaching the age...
-
When the Australian Tax Office (ATO) made a request to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) for information about a number of UK companies, HMRC was happy to comply with the request, despite the fact that the companies claimed to have received no notice that...
-
In an important victory for developers, which also represents a serious blow to those committed to preserving open spaces for public recreation, a campaigner has failed to convince the Supreme Court that a playing field which had been used by local people...
-
The Court of Appeal has concluded that a product description which contains a geographical term can constitute 'passing off' if the product does not in fact come from the place named. The description of a product as 'Greek' (in this case Greek yoghurt)...
-
The purpose of EU Directive 92/85EC – the Pregnant Workers Directive – is 'to encourage improvements in the safety and health at work of pregnant workers and workers who have recently given birth or are breastfeeding'. In the UK, surrogacy is...
-
There is all the difference in the world between deceit and hard bargaining, as a recent case shows. It involved a disgruntled company which failed to convince the High Court that it had missed out on a multi-million-pound oil and gas exploration deal due...
-
Two leading investment banks have achieved tax savings of almost £100 million after the Court of Appeal accepted that schemes designed to avoid payment of Income Tax (IT) and National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on employee bonuses lawfully...
-
When a tenant failed to include precisely the right wording for exercising its right to break its lease, the court ruled that use of the exact words specified was not necessary and therefore disallowed the landlord's claim that the break notice was invalid. ...
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Expectations for manufacturing output growth in the next three months are strong, despite an easing of pace over the past quarter, according to the latest CBI Industrial Trends Survey. And export order books have recovered after a dip last month, though...
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A farming company in Cheshire has been fined £50,000 after a 30-year-old worker suffered fatal injuries when a 1.5 tonne concrete panel fell on him. Sean Bennett was helping to construct a new cowshed at Yew Tree Farm in Stanthorne when the accident...
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Gregg Latchams  and ActionCOACH will be hosting an event at one of North Somerset’s success stories , Puxton Park on 1st October – 10 am till 1:30 pm The event will explore: How to create and legally protect a brand How...
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Our next GL Business Club event will focus on family businesses, the issues that can arise and how you can effectively manage them – legally! The event will take place on Tuesday 30 September 2014 between 8.00am and 9.30am and we look forward to...
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Trade marks are a fairly difficult area in law and challenges to the registration (or, if registration is granted, the validity) of trade marks are common. Words and/or logos can be trade marks, but to be acceptable for registration a trade mark must be...
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In a classic case of 'following the money', determined liquidators have succeeded in tracing £500,000 which was paid out of a company's bank account shortly before it became insolvent, owing more than £1.4 million to the tax authorities. The...
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In a further case on the admissibility as evidence before the Employment Tribunal (ET) of an employee's covert recordings of grievance and disciplinary hearings, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) ruled that not only those parts of the employee's recording...
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The Court of Appeal has overturned the decision of the High Court that a firm of accountants had acted negligently when it failed to point out tax saving opportunities to a client when he sold his company. The accountants had failed to bring to the...
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When a couple engaged a firm of architects to manage the refurbishment of their house, the architects inserted a 'net contribution clause' into the contract. The intention of the clause was to limit the liability of the architects to the extent to which any...
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A whistleblowing ex-policeman was sacked not because of his protected disclosures but due to his pursuit of complaints in a way that was 'sufficient to try and to exhaust the patience of any organisation', the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has ruled ( ...
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A whistleblowing ex-policeman was sacked not because of his protected disclosures but due to his pursuit of complaints in a way that was 'sufficient to try and to exhaust the patience of any organisation', the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has ruled ( ...
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The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has published a new guide to protecting personal data, 'Protecting personal data in online services: learning from the mistakes of others' , which it describes as outlining the procedures organisations must follow...
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A study published recently by the Association of Accounting Technicians ( AAT ) suggests that "relationships with colleagues, self-worth and nature of the job" mean more to UK workers than the size of their take-home pay. Of the 2,000 employees...
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When a publisher and the firm managing its subscription database fell out over the database manager's quality of service, the publisher gave the database manager a month's notice to terminate the contract. In response, the database manager refused to release...
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A study carried out by security software provider Kaspersky Lab suggests that cyber attacks are more common than many small-business owners believe, with many of them "woefully unprepared" for an IT security breach, despite growing reliance on...