Legal News

Readers who live apart from their spouses or civil partners, but who have not formally dissolved their relationships, are warned that following changes to inheritance law brought into effect in October 2014 by the Inheritance and Trustees' Powers Act 2014 ,...
Guidance from the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure and the UK's National Technical Authority for Information Assurance highlights some of the aspects organisations must consider when adopting a 'Bring Your Own Device' (BYOD) approach,...
As New Year breaks, we wish you a very happy, healthy and harmonious 2015. Stay with us for employment law news as it happens; there’s a lot in store. So it’s back to work, and perhaps back to the drawing board for those pushing for the...
If you’re running a family business, the issue of succession planning is sure to be on your mind. You’ll know that getting it is right is vital, not just for the future financial success of the business, but for the sake of your family too. ...
The public interest in open justice has trumped individual privacy rights in a case in which lawyers sought to protect child beneficiaries of a very substantial family trust from the glare of publicity – which it was feared would undermine their...
A litigant who was in the grip of a psychotic episode when he turned up an hour late to an Employment Tribunal (ET) hearing – only to discover that his claim had been struck out in his absence – has been given fresh hope of compensation ( U v...
Residential landlords will be aware of their legal responsibility under the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 to have annual safety inspections carried out on the gas appliances in the properties they let. The inspections cover the...
In a decision which will give some comfort to many hard-pressed businesses , a tax tribunal has ruled that a small company's unexpected cash-flow problems provided a 'reasonable excuse' for its late payment of its PAYE liabilities. The...
The importance of considering the fine details of proposed arrangements was sharply illustrated in a recent case in which the High Court accepted a claim by HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) that a gift to a charity did not qualify for exemption from...
A recent claim for negligence against a firm of architects , which resulted in a five-day court hearing, has led to a couple rueing their decision to litigate a dispute. The couple wished to build a garage and workshop in the grounds of their property and...
The thought that friends or family members might be passing their later years in a care home which is unsafe is a disturbing one for anyone, so the recent announcement by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) that a care home in Hertfordshire has been fined...
Just because a court ruling seems harsh does not mean that the judge making it was biased, as is illustrated by a decision by the Court of Appeal that a judge was wrong to disqualify himself from continuing to hear a highly contentious case after he was...
The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has published guidance for employers and employees on the new 'Fit for Work' service, originally referred to as the Health and Work Service, which is due to be phased in over the coming months. The service,...
A former couple engaged in an acrimonious copyright dispute in respect of trading software which lay at the heart of their phenomenally successful business have run up £19 million in legal bills. The husband, a mathematician and computer programmer,...
In a cautionary tale for anyone considering entering into an equity release scheme, a woman who sold her home at a fraction of its true value, on the understanding that she could stay there for life, is facing eviction following a Supreme Court ruling . ...
As New Year breaks, we wish you a very happy, healthy and harmonious 2015. Stay with us for employment law news as it happens; there’s a lot in store. So it’s back to work, and perhaps back to the drawing board for those pushing for the...
A bank worker who claims she was subjected to a campaign of abuse and degrading treatment by colleagues due to the 'pot-pourri' of medical conditions from which she suffered has sustained a serious setback in her fight for compensation ( Morgan Stanley...
When a firm of valuers placed a valuation of €135 million on a property in Germany in 2005, in connection with a complex refinancing package, and it subsequently turned out to be worth much less, a legal dispute was almost inevitable when the deal went...
One of Britain's finest stately homes, Tottenham House, will be sold to a mystery buyer for £11.25 million – despite the fierce objections of the Earl of Cardigan – after the Court of Appeal ruled that estate trustees had acted reasonably ...
The 5th of January, the first working day back after Christmas, was dubbed Divorce Day by the press. Many column inches (or should that be pixels?) were spent explaining the phenomenon. Family lawyers, the stories claim, are at their busiest this time of...

Latest News

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Guidance from the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure and the UK's National Technical Authority for Information Assurance highlights some of the aspects organisations must consider when adopting a 'Bring Your Own Device' (BYOD) approach,...
-
A litigant who was in the grip of a psychotic episode when he turned up an hour late to an Employment Tribunal (ET) hearing – only to discover that his claim had been struck out in his absence – has been given fresh hope of compensation ( U v...
-
In a decision which will give some comfort to many hard-pressed businesses , a tax tribunal has ruled that a small company's unexpected cash-flow problems provided a 'reasonable excuse' for its late payment of its PAYE liabilities. The...
-
A recent claim for negligence against a firm of architects , which resulted in a five-day court hearing, has led to a couple rueing their decision to litigate a dispute. The couple wished to build a garage and workshop in the grounds of their property and...
-
Just because a court ruling seems harsh does not mean that the judge making it was biased, as is illustrated by a decision by the Court of Appeal that a judge was wrong to disqualify himself from continuing to hear a highly contentious case after he was...
-
The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has published guidance for employers and employees on the new 'Fit for Work' service, originally referred to as the Health and Work Service, which is due to be phased in over the coming months. The service,...
-
A former couple engaged in an acrimonious copyright dispute in respect of trading software which lay at the heart of their phenomenally successful business have run up £19 million in legal bills. The husband, a mathematician and computer programmer,...
-
As New Year breaks, we wish you a very happy, healthy and harmonious 2015. Stay with us for employment law news as it happens; there’s a lot in store. So it’s back to work, and perhaps back to the drawing board for those pushing for the...
-
A bank worker who claims she was subjected to a campaign of abuse and degrading treatment by colleagues due to the 'pot-pourri' of medical conditions from which she suffered has sustained a serious setback in her fight for compensation ( Morgan Stanley...
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When a firm of valuers placed a valuation of €135 million on a property in Germany in 2005, in connection with a complex refinancing package, and it subsequently turned out to be worth much less, a legal dispute was almost inevitable when the deal went...
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Private Residence Relief (PRR) is one of the most valuable reliefs against Capital Gains Tax (CGT). It exempts from charge gains made on the principal private residence of a UK taxpayer. PRR is often claimed by people who buy properties and live in them...
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Although, as a general rule, an illegal contract is unenforceable, a City broker who offered to supply insider information to a friend for £620,000 but then reneged on the promise has been ordered to repay the money. The broker claimed to have access...
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In a case which vividly illustrates the exacting health and safety standards placed on industrial employers , a flooring company was convicted and fined over an accident which an injured employee accepted had in part resulted from his own foolishness. The...
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A couple who made £13 million by selling their land for residential development are in line for a further very substantial sum after the High Court interpreted in their favour a contractual term which entitled them to additional payments, depending...
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In a warning to traders that those who deal in counterfeit goods are at risk of losing their liberty, a market stall holder who was caught offering for sale fake Apple mobile phone chargers and USB leads has failed in an appeal against a 13-month prison...
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A recent survey of 1,200 company car drivers found that more than 1,000 admitted to having falsified their mileage claims. 89 per cent had submitted inaccurate claims and 63 per cent had added 'non-business' mileage to their claim. In addition, more than a...
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The Government has taken action to reduce the potential costs to employers of last month's decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal in Bear Scotland Ltd. v Fulton that holiday pay should reflect non-guaranteed overtime that is routinely worked. The ...
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The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has upheld an earlier ruling of the Advocate General on a question raised by the Danish District Court in holding that severe obesity can be considered a disability under EU law. The issue arose in the case...
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In a case which illustrates the magnitude of the task faced by Employment Tribunals in resolving the most factually complex cases, a black professor who claimed to be the victim of a 'conscious conspiracy emanating from the very top' at the university where...
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The High Court has ruled that fees for the use of Employment Tribunals (ETs) and the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) are lawful. The fees were first introduced by the Government in July 2013. Since then, the number of cases coming before ETs and the EAT...
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The Central London residential property market is known to have risen to dizzying heights over the last few years, which has led to the victory by residents of a prestige mansion block in their five-year struggle to acquire the building's freehold proving to...
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Government research has found that 55% of UK consumers find it hard to support local small firms because many businesses aren’t online. Two million sole traders and small companies (39%) are missing out on business because they have no online...
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It is fairly widely known that in a legal dispute some documents can be 'privileged', which means that they cannot be used in evidence. Normally, communications between a solicitor and their client are privileged. However, the right of privilege is not...
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The number of private sector businesses in the UK has reached a new high of 5.2 million. There has been a record annual increase of 330,000 businesses (up 6.7%) on last year, according to the latest government figures released this week. There has now...
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In a cautionary tale for anyone tempted to go before a court or tribunal without legal assistance, a worker whose wife hastily withdrew his unfair dismissal claim in the heat of the moment has been told that he will have to live with the consequences ( ...